Events

Oct
22
Fri
Information Seminar on Mental Well-being for Law Students
Oct 22 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

This information session is presented by Crown Attorney Carolyn Reimer and MB Justice Therapist Shannon Daniels.

Oct
23
Sat
Indigenous People and the Criminal Justice System seminar 2021 @ Virtual
Oct 23 @ 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Indigenous People and the Criminal Justice System

Instructors:
Melissa Serbin
Senior Crown Attorney
Manitoba Prosecutions Service

Stacey Soldier
Associate Counsel
Cochrane Saxberg Barristers & Solicitors

*NEW* Class Times and Locations:
October 16, 23, 30 November 6
9:00am – 12:00pm
Virtual, Robson Hall, University of Manitoba
(Deadline to register is October 7th, 2021. Class size limited to 40 participants.)

Course Description:

There is a growing recognition in Canada, across all sectors and regions, of the need for a deeper understanding and more meaningful inclusion of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada. One of the centrepieces of this recognition was the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, released in 2015, which included 94 calls to action to effect reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. Call to Action 27 was directed at the legal community of Canada, calling on us (through the Federation of Law Societies of Canada) to:

Ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

These goals have been acknowledged by the provincial law societies, the Federation of Law Societies of Canada, and the Canadian Bar Association. As stated by former Chief Justice of British Columbia Lance Finch, lawyers have a “duty to learn”.

The Indigenous People and Criminal Justice System seminar was created in the spirit of these ideas. The seminar is will assist students and lawyers in learning about Indigenous cultures and understanding the interplay between Indigenous legal orders and the Canadian legal system.

This intensive seminar will follow the general introduction to the complexities and principles of criminal law presented in courses on criminal law and evidence. It emphasizes the ways in which these complexities and principles intersect with Indigenous concepts of justice. The class will engage in a critical analysis of the relationship between Indigenous accused and the Courts through multiple stages of the justice system: arrest, bail, pre-trial procedures, and sentencing. Throughout the course the role of the Crown and defence counsel and the obligations created by these roles will be discussed. Participants will examine Gladue reports, culturally important ceremonies and the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system.

Participants will receive a letter upon completion of this seminar. It is well suited for students considering working in the field of criminal law and for lawyers interested in furthering legal education.

Continuing Professional Development for Lawyers

This seminar will qualify for the following Continuing Professional Development hours:

Law Society of Manitoba: 12 CPD hours; and 4 Ethics & Professional Responsibility hours

Law Society of Alberta: for Alberta lawyers, consider including this course as a CPD learning activity in your mandatory annual Continuing Professional Development Plan as required by the Law Society of Alberta.

The Law Society of Ontario has approved this course for 12 hours of EDI Professionalism.

Cost:
Lawyers (called more than 5 years ago), $650 +5% GST
Lawyers (called less than 5 years ago), $300 +5% GST
Articling Students, $150 +5% GST
Law Students, $0

Please contact Ying Chen at ying.chen2@umanitoba.ca with any questions about registration.

Oct
25
Mon
The CDO Presents an Information Session with the Honorable Justice Lafreniere on Clerkships
Oct 25 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

More Details to follow.

Oct
26
Tue
Mask-and-Learn lunch talks
Oct 26 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Mask-and-Learn lunch talks

Join Assistant Professor Brandon Trask in-person in the Moot Courtroom at Robson Hall for a new series of talks for Juris Doctor students on practice-oriented topics

Given the University of Manitoba’s COVID-19 policy, these talks will be held in person at Robson Hall (up to a maximum of 25 students, subject to the necessary protocol measures), in the moot courtroom.

  • Sept 14 (12 pm to 1:30 pm; topic: “Looking after your mental health as a lawyer”);
  • Oct 12 (12 pm to 1:30 pm; topic: “The essential building blocks of a criminal case”); and
  • Oct 26 (12 pm to 1:30 pm; topic: “The importance of strategic lawyering at all stages of a case”)?

These talks will be live-streamed except for the first one on Sept. 14.

Please register at this link for all three talks: https://forms.office.com/r/8WLqZB1nVC

Oct
27
Wed
CARL presents: Immigration & Refugee Law in Manitoba: A Discussion with Practicing Professionals @ Zoom
Oct 27 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

CARL presents: Immigration & Refugee Law in Manitoba: A Discussion with Practicing Professionals

Canadian Association of Refugee Lawyers – Robson Hall chapter is hosting a speaker panel event to offer students an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of Immigration and Refugee Law in Manitoba. This event will connect you with practicing professionals and their practical experiences working as an immigration and refugee lawyer in Manitoba. Our expert panelists will discuss the daily realities of their work, the skills that are most useful in delivering on those expectations, and the effects of the pandemic on their practice.

Event Details:

Date & Time: October 27, 2021 – 12pm – 1pm

To obtain the Zoom link, please refer to your umanitoba email from Shawn Singh dated Tuesday, October 19 at 10:59am.

Speakers:

Oct
28
Thu
Distinguished Visitors Lecture Series presents: Dr. Carol Liao (Allard School of Law) @ Online
Oct 28 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Distinguished Visitors Lecture Series presents: Dr. Carol Liao (Allard School of Law) @ Online

The Distinguished Visitors Lecture Series kicks off its 2021-2022 season with a talk from Dr. Carol Liao, an Associate Professor, UBC Sauder Distinguished Scholar​, and Director of the Centre for Business Law  at the Peter A. Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia.

Dr. Liao will speak on “Critical Race Feminism and Sustainable Corporate Law”.

Please register for this event here: https://forms.office.com/r/XWt0Dy2M12

Abstract

Corporate law aims to regulate the different power dynamics among directors, officers, shareholders, and other stakeholders of the corporation. But other notions of power have a pervasive impact on our corporate institutions. The rise of big business, pooling of capital, and concentration of power in the world generated from a very gendered and colonial history. In this talk, Dr. Liao reflects upon feminist and anti-racist discourses to identify the systemic disadvantages inherent in our corporate legal systems, and considers the ways in which corporate law entrenches gender and racial inequality, erects barriers to participation from historically marginalized groups, and fortifies masculine norms of governance.

Critical race feminism tests the self-interested shareholder concept and aligns with social finance movements and broader conceptions of impact and value, while critiquing the disproportionately negative effect corporate power has had on racialized and Indigenous peoples, particularly Black, Indigenous, and other women of colour. Awareness of power imbalances in the boardroom, in the day-to-day functioning of corporate activities, and even in our dialogues on corporate law itself within industry and academia, are critical in reform efforts. The next decade marks an important period as businesses adapt to worldwide pressures for sustainability under our climate emergency. In the pursuit of a net-zero carbon future, structural change is needed to dismantle patriarchal systems and intersectional critiques are necessary for environmental, social, and economic sustainability to be realized in the age of the Anthropocene.

Annual Law Banquet @ Winnipeg Art Gallery
Oct 28 @ 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Save this date for the Annual Law Banquet, this year in-person at the Winnipeg Art Gallery! Details to come but meanwhile, enjoy this UM Today story about last year’s event:

Against all odds, annual Law Banquet connects mentors and students virtually

 

Oct
29
Fri
2L Information Session with CDO/PDC @ Zoom
Oct 29 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Oct
30
Sat
Indigenous People and the Criminal Justice System seminar 2021 @ Virtual
Oct 30 @ 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Indigenous People and the Criminal Justice System

Instructors:
Melissa Serbin
Senior Crown Attorney
Manitoba Prosecutions Service

Stacey Soldier
Associate Counsel
Cochrane Saxberg Barristers & Solicitors

*NEW* Class Times and Locations:
October 16, 23, 30 November 6
9:00am – 12:00pm
Virtual, Robson Hall, University of Manitoba
(Deadline to register is October 7th, 2021. Class size limited to 40 participants.)

Course Description:

There is a growing recognition in Canada, across all sectors and regions, of the need for a deeper understanding and more meaningful inclusion of the Indigenous Peoples of Canada. One of the centrepieces of this recognition was the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, released in 2015, which included 94 calls to action to effect reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. Call to Action 27 was directed at the legal community of Canada, calling on us (through the Federation of Law Societies of Canada) to:

Ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

These goals have been acknowledged by the provincial law societies, the Federation of Law Societies of Canada, and the Canadian Bar Association. As stated by former Chief Justice of British Columbia Lance Finch, lawyers have a “duty to learn”.

The Indigenous People and Criminal Justice System seminar was created in the spirit of these ideas. The seminar is will assist students and lawyers in learning about Indigenous cultures and understanding the interplay between Indigenous legal orders and the Canadian legal system.

This intensive seminar will follow the general introduction to the complexities and principles of criminal law presented in courses on criminal law and evidence. It emphasizes the ways in which these complexities and principles intersect with Indigenous concepts of justice. The class will engage in a critical analysis of the relationship between Indigenous accused and the Courts through multiple stages of the justice system: arrest, bail, pre-trial procedures, and sentencing. Throughout the course the role of the Crown and defence counsel and the obligations created by these roles will be discussed. Participants will examine Gladue reports, culturally important ceremonies and the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system.

Participants will receive a letter upon completion of this seminar. It is well suited for students considering working in the field of criminal law and for lawyers interested in furthering legal education.

Continuing Professional Development for Lawyers

This seminar will qualify for the following Continuing Professional Development hours:

Law Society of Manitoba: 12 CPD hours; and 4 Ethics & Professional Responsibility hours

Law Society of Alberta: for Alberta lawyers, consider including this course as a CPD learning activity in your mandatory annual Continuing Professional Development Plan as required by the Law Society of Alberta.

The Law Society of Ontario has approved this course for 12 hours of EDI Professionalism.

Cost:
Lawyers (called more than 5 years ago), $650 +5% GST
Lawyers (called less than 5 years ago), $300 +5% GST
Articling Students, $150 +5% GST
Law Students, $0

Please contact Ying Chen at ying.chen2@umanitoba.ca with any questions about registration.

Nov
2
Tue
Rod Senft Lecture: Harvey Secter, O.M. on the impact of successful family businesses on communities @ Online
Nov 2 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Rod Senft Lecture: Harvey Secter, O.M. on the impact of successful family businesses on communities @ Online

The Faculty of Law is pleased to present the Rod Senft Lecture in Family Business Law, featuring Harvey Secter, O.M. [BComm/67, LLB/92] on Tuesday, November 2 at 12:00 p.m. 

Mr. Secter’s talk will focus on “Successful family businesses build strong economies and healthy communities: The advisor’s role in perpetuating the virtuous circle.”

Mr. Secter will welcome questions after the presentation.

To attend, please RSVP using this form: https://forms.office.com/r/erdePWhAcA  The Zoom link will be sent to registered guests prior to the event.

About Harvey Secter
After completing a Bachelor of Commerce degree in 1967, Mr. Secter directed the growth of his family’s retail business, Ricki’s Canada Limited, from a ten-store chain to a multi-divisional national operation of 150 stores. He was a member of the ownership group of the Winnipeg Jets and pursued a business career until 1988 when he returned to the University of Manitoba to pursue a law degree, graduating with the Gold Medal in 1992. He then obtained a Master of Laws degree at Harvard where he became a visiting researcher and instructor for Harvard’s program on negotiation. Returning to Manitoba, he was an instructor at the Faculty of Law from 1995 to 1999 before serving as Dean of Law from 1999 to 2008. He then served as Chancellor of the University of Manitoba from 2010 to 2019.

About the talk

Forbes reported that studies by leading international research firms found family-owned or family-controlled corporations consistently outperform their peers in almost all sectors across the globe over the long term. Family-controlled firms are more prevalent than most people are aware and represent 1/3 of the companies on the S&P 500. While large family businesses gather headlines, their smaller siblings create greater impact. In Canada, 98% of incorporated businesses are small or medium sized. (SME’s). These predominantly family-owned firms account for more than 60% of employment in the private sector and generate more than half of our GDP and job growth.

In addition to this major economic impact, family businesses and business families play critical roles in creating and sustaining healthy and caring communities. Winnipeg is a classic example of a city where the quality of life is enhanced by the financial support and leadership entrepreneurs, their companies, family, and associates provide to local institutions and organizations.

Notwithstanding their prevalence and significance, only 50% of new corporations reach their 5th birthday. Studies show that only 12% of family businesses successfully transition to the 3rd generation. Many emerging changes suggest that the transitional challenges will grow more severe in the future. This session will explore how lawyers, as principal advisors to private family businesses, can enhance the prospects for successfully transitioning more of these enterprises in the future.